Sisyphus’ map of tiny, perfect things

I’ve posted about Albert Camus’ philosophy regarding Sisyphus and how imagining him happy is a way to look at one’s own mundane, plodding life.

And I’ve also mentioned how Groundhog Day’s Phil Connors embodies Sisyphus.

Nice artwork, eh?

Well, I recently watched a campy, but fairly endearing story that takes both of those themes and includes them in the script.

“The Map of Tiny, Perfect Things” (Amazon Prime) does a pretty good job of depicting the trope of being stuck in the same day for eternity. It may not be worth watching more than once (like Bill Murray’s film), but it’s worth at least one viewing.

What struck me, of course, is that this connection I’d made between Phil Connors being Sisyphus was one I’d shared prolly four years ago. And it was cool to see the theme exposed in a film.

There’s the map of perfect things (places)

 

Dear ‘Mudge: About your addiction to TV

Dear ‘Mudge,

I’ve been thinking about the phenomena of consuming visual-aural narrative and how I believe our minds react and respond to the sequential stimulation they offer. Or, to put it another way, why do movies engage us so?

I’m sitting here watching yet another movie I’ve seen a half dozen times, Wolverine. Regardless of what one’s opinion is of this one film, to me it’s engrossing at times, flippant or amusing at others. It, like its hundreds of thousands of brethren, does something to my brain, it captivates me — for a time.

And then it’s over. The sequence of events completes and what was once riveting, is now just a memory of bits and pieces that only vaguely come to mind when I concentrate on them. Which I don’t.

In-movie-mind is this experience which is different than normal existence. We can think about scenes in a film or captivating television show but these thoughts are nothing like consuming the media itself. Watching one is like being there, in the moment — at least with a good one. And although one may have previously viewed the cinematic experience before, one can still drift into it and relive it upon watching it again.

What is this sensation? Why and how is it different than normal experiential life?

Have you thought about this curiosity yourself?

Does your trailer come with an in-home theater?

‘Mole

~~~

Had to throw in a gratuitous flickpic cuz, you know, pictures ‘n posts.

The Wolverine Review

Clubbed — a card game

Roughly ten years ago, my daughter and I came up with a new card game. We were into table games and exploring various card games at the time. A few years later we decided to submit the game to a site that collected such things. Years later, they finally posted the game and referenced us in the notes. Years after that, a few months ago, in fact, Mark (referenced below) contacted me, had found the game and wanted to produce a video. This is his excellent effort.

Strange how things you post online catch up with you sometimes.

Cheers,

‘Mole

Live Long and Prosper — in AI

Yes, the dead will speak. And they will have trained themselves to do it.

(See prior posts regarding this topic.)

This is only the beginning.

From Reuters:

quote:

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Actor William Shatner, best known for forging new frontiers on the “Star Trek” TV series, has tapped new technology that will give current and future generations the chance to query him about his life, family and career.

Shatner, who turned 90 on Monday, spent more than 45 hours over five days recording answers to be used in an interactive video created by Los Angeles-based company StoryFile.

Starting in May, people using cellphones or computers connected to the internet can ask questions of the Shatner video, and artificial intelligence will scan through transcripts of his remarks to deliver the best answer, according to StoryFile co-founder Stephen Smith.

Fans may even be able to beam Shatner into their living rooms in future, Smith said, as Shatner was filmed with 3-D cameras that will enable his answers to be delivered via a hologram.

Shatner, who played Captain Kirk on “Star Trek” from 1966 to 1969 and in a later series of “Star Trek” movies, answered 650 questions on topics from the best and worst parts of working on the classic sci-fi show to where he grew up and the meaning of life.

The Canadian-born actor said he “wanted to reveal myself as intimately as possible” for his family and others.

“This is a legacy,” Shatner said. “This is like what you would leave your children, what you’d leave on your gravestone, the possibilities are endless.”

:unquote

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In other news, my existence continues. Nothing much going on, nor has my muse escaped from her prison (shut up down there!) so, why bore you all with a tiresome report. If I had a news-worthy story like the ‘Mudge, well, I’d be happy to share it.

Dear Mole: Trailer Trash

Dear Mole,

Where were we again? Oh, right — I sold my car, they raised my rent, ain’t got no job, oh woe is Mudge!

Hey, if you’re going to publicize your troubles online like you’re writing a bad country and western song, you gotta own it, right?

Speaking of country and western songs, I must once again paraphrase the late Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr (who, in turn, was famously paraphrased by the late Neil Peart): plus ça change plus c’est la même chose.

That single-wide trailer up there is my new home. Jesse’s, too. My dad bought it for me and it’s situated in the mountains about 10 miles outside of Albuquerque. That white shit on the ground is snow because Cedar Crest, NM is 6,500 feet above sea level. The trailer park looks like a campground and my place is all the way at the end with a rock wall encircling the back yard that overlooks the Sandia and Manzano Mountains.

And I’ve just enough to spare to buy myself a shitty used car so’s I can journey into Albuquerque when I need to forage for groceries and, um…*cough*…supplies.

For the time being, I won’t be inviting Bubbles to move into a shed in the yard with his cats nor will I let Ricky sleep in his car in the driveway. Leahy and Randy are watching.

So I’ve nearly achieved my dream of becoming a mountain hermit. And this is but a scant mile away from my new mountain hermitage:

Fucking Burger Boy.

Entropy, Cohesion, Repeat ad infinitum,

‘Mudge