Moby Dick Keyboard

May I present your new keyboard layout. It is based on the character counts from Moby Dick.

MobyDickKeyboard

It’s based on the letter frequencies derived from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.

What we did was to take the letters, and balance them left to right around frequency and distance to move one’s fingers. This is how the keyboard should have been designed from the beginning. This would have been the most efficient pattern to build a keyboard. (No, Dvorak’s is better than the QWERTY but not as well designed as this specification).

By placing letters clustered by frequency, but on opposite sides of the board, we balance the work done by both hands.

Notice we separate the comma and period, no shift necessary. The slash and backslash are combined, as well as the 1 and pipe. The brackets are placed opposite as well as the question mark and exclamation. All the other keys are essentially left alone. The colon and semi-colon have been moved as those two have no place resting beneath the right hand pinky finger.

No doubt some further optimizations could be applied, two letter combinations that appear more frequently than others, but for the most part, this layout is a far superior model for human hand configuration.

Here are the frequencies as extracted from that historic text:

Left Right
114980 E T 86548
83823 A O 68131
64556 N I 64385
63106 S H 61777
51157 R L 42045
37662 D U 26251
22900 M C 22142
21774 W G 20491
20476 F P 16960
16602 Y B 16601
8418 V K 7937
1544 Q J 1061
1006 X Z 624
18948 , . 7385
1000 ? ! 1740
4139 ; : 196

[Continuing on this whale of a theory, more than just the frequency of key strokes should be considered. By doing a simple random key press test of about 500 keys, reached by their ease of access, I was able to produce a actual touch count which should be used as an overlay to place the letter counts from above.

For instance, the “F” key is indeed the most readily pressed key. The “J” key, the next down. But oddly the “I” key and the “W” keys (on the QWERTY board) come with high counts too. So, more accurately, a random finger press test should be used as the basis to determine finger extent and counts and then the letter counts from Moby Dick applied over top.

If this sounds like rambling, you’re right. Vicodin is a great drug.]

 

 

 

 


What’s your pain level?

Hell, I don’t know, a three, maybe?

Turns out my imagined pain scale placed my number rather low. I considered a one to be a bee sting and a ten to feel like I was cutting off my own left hand with a rusty hacksaw.

Given such a context, yeah, my pain registered in at a three. Well, apparently my tape measure, pulled from too many movies, belied my actual discomfort. My three is their six. Once we aligned our rulers I finally received relief.

Pain is subjective. How long is a string? How deep your depression? How high your elation?

The surgeon showed up and apologised. Surgery doesn’t always run on time. I’m glad mine did, though.

Thanks for you guys’ kind thoughts.


Waiting for the surgeon

So, this guy is laying in a hospital bed waiting in prep for surgery. The nurse comes in and says the surgeon will be two hours late. The IV is in his arm. Everyone is on deck. Two hours to wait.

Does he get pissed? Does he curse the surgeon when he finally shows up? What? And risk an upset doctor? Hell no. I just have to lay here and wait, hungry and bored.


Writer’s Log: 2112 Instinct

My latest WIP has failed to gel within my mind. I continued to force my main character into the lime-light. Time and again, the fellow held up his hands and shied away.

Wrong protagonist.

I knew this instinctively, but kept to my plans with the boy, Rogan, and his character arc. I thought I wanted the story to be about him. He finally convinced me he’d prefer second string.

The story, it seems, would favor my chosen antagonist as lead, the guy who wants to infect the world with his CRISPR engineered virus that kills 99% of those infected and leaves survivors *changed*.

I finally realized why the boy was not the right guy: I’d rather have the bad guy win. All I needed to do was to list out separately what I’d rather have happen in any story I write. Akin to M.R.Carey’s break-out novel The Girl With All The Gifts, it’s the infected leader, the author convinces you, who should persevere and prevail. The GGR, as I’ve imagined, necessary to alter humanity’s understanding of itself, that is, the Great Global Reset.

So, I’ll be taking my sinister lead and try to sway readers into siding with his vision. It feels better already. I guess I should follow my instincts more often.

 

 

 

 


Stewie the Stoic: In Review

For all who participated, we enjoyed thirty days of Stewie the Stoic’s take on Seneca’s philosophy of being a Stoic. Specifically, about fifty of Sececa’s letters to Lucilius, an acolyte and fellow, budding Stoic.

Death & Fortune

These were the two dominant topics that we found in nearly every writing example we analyzed. If we weren’t discussing the actual End, we were talking about our “awareness of self” along the way—to the End. That, in addition to how fortune (or misfortune) taunts us into betraying ourselves.

These will be the points with which I’ll be stumbling away, drunk on philosophy.

  1. I will die. When, matters little. How one manages the approach and final act will set the tone for one’s daily well-being.
  2. In the mean time, live in self awareness of the origin and intent of my desires: be not their slave, but neither their master.
  3. Fortune comes in many flavors: fame, riches, luck, comfort. Neither pursue its presence nor lament its absence. That which benefits, accept with humility; that which diminishes receive with fortitude.

That’s pretty much it, for now.

Thanks for tagging along.

 


Stewie the Stoic: Prosperity

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[Quote courtesy of Seneca]

[Although Seneca was a rich old bastard, we’ll have to give him the benefit of the doubt when it comes to understanding how one might separate one’s fortune from one’s pursuit of what he calls philosophy. In order to develop a “love of wisdom”, money need not influence one’s progress. Although, I’d bet that being frickin’ rich makes it one hell of a lot easier to pretend to be poor than actually being poor.

On the flip side, having disdain for the finer things in life, that is, being poor, might jade one to believe they can attain their wisdom all the more readily as they have no bright, sparkly objects to distract them.

The one thing I find curious in reading all of these pontifications is, jeeze, they sure had a lot of time to pontificate over the smallest of topics. Yeah, I’m wasting a few minutes here and there on this endeavor. But, the effort these Stoics put into just being Stoic, from what I can tell, hell, I’d like to have a life like that.]


Stewie the Stoic: Failure

StewieTheStoic029

[Quotes provided by Seneca]

[Up from the ashes,
up from the ashes,
grow the roses of success.
Grow the ro, grow the ro, grow the roses…
Sing it with me now.]