Lo, Saturnalia

Just a ditty tossed out amongst the dross of logging activity metrics and channeling error messages into PagerDuty (oh what a bane on society that thing is!)

(Starts like JingleBells…)

Lo, Saturnalia
~~~~~~~~~~~
On Saturnalia go,
Out into the snow,
Take your master’s clothes,
And wear them like your own.

Drag your keg of beer,
To the bonfire burning near,
Lift your mug on high,
and raise your voice in cheer.

Ohhhh, the old year dies,
the new year’s born,
the gods are smiling down.
Saturn on his lofty throne,
is baying like a hound.

The ol’ yule log,
the roasting hog,
the gifts to loved ones dear,
are demonstrated, celebrated
to last throughout the year.

Dear Mudge: Hot Ones

Hey Mudge,

I know you enjoy television style production and so I just wanted to share a couple of YouTube videos that were some of the best, I thought, in honest television production. I include EweToob as a TV platform because, come on, it’s passively watching some production video, right? And… I watch it on my damn TV.

The first one, which I just finished watching, is Elijah Wood who does such an incredible job as a guest that my respect for the man and his history shot up a hundred fold, at least.

The next is the same show, but with Matt Damon, who is just as polite and gracious. Kudos to both of these fellows.

 

 

Sisyphus’ map of tiny, perfect things

I’ve posted about Albert Camus’ philosophy regarding Sisyphus and how imagining him happy is a way to look at one’s own mundane, plodding life.

And I’ve also mentioned how Groundhog Day’s Phil Connors embodies Sisyphus.

Nice artwork, eh?

Well, I recently watched a campy, but fairly endearing story that takes both of those themes and includes them in the script.

“The Map of Tiny, Perfect Things” (Amazon Prime) does a pretty good job of depicting the trope of being stuck in the same day for eternity. It may not be worth watching more than once (like Bill Murray’s film), but it’s worth at least one viewing.

What struck me, of course, is that this connection I’d made between Phil Connors being Sisyphus was one I’d shared prolly four years ago. And it was cool to see the theme exposed in a film.

There’s the map of perfect things (places)

 

Clubbed — a card game

Roughly ten years ago, my daughter and I came up with a new card game. We were into table games and exploring various card games at the time. A few years later we decided to submit the game to a site that collected such things. Years later, they finally posted the game and referenced us in the notes. Years after that, a few months ago, in fact, Mark (referenced below) contacted me, had found the game and wanted to produce a video. This is his excellent effort.

Strange how things you post online catch up with you sometimes.

Cheers,

‘Mole

Live Long and Prosper — in AI

Yes, the dead will speak. And they will have trained themselves to do it.

(See prior posts regarding this topic.)

This is only the beginning.

From Reuters:

quote:

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Actor William Shatner, best known for forging new frontiers on the “Star Trek” TV series, has tapped new technology that will give current and future generations the chance to query him about his life, family and career.

Shatner, who turned 90 on Monday, spent more than 45 hours over five days recording answers to be used in an interactive video created by Los Angeles-based company StoryFile.

Starting in May, people using cellphones or computers connected to the internet can ask questions of the Shatner video, and artificial intelligence will scan through transcripts of his remarks to deliver the best answer, according to StoryFile co-founder Stephen Smith.

Fans may even be able to beam Shatner into their living rooms in future, Smith said, as Shatner was filmed with 3-D cameras that will enable his answers to be delivered via a hologram.

Shatner, who played Captain Kirk on “Star Trek” from 1966 to 1969 and in a later series of “Star Trek” movies, answered 650 questions on topics from the best and worst parts of working on the classic sci-fi show to where he grew up and the meaning of life.

The Canadian-born actor said he “wanted to reveal myself as intimately as possible” for his family and others.

“This is a legacy,” Shatner said. “This is like what you would leave your children, what you’d leave on your gravestone, the possibilities are endless.”

:unquote

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In other news, my existence continues. Nothing much going on, nor has my muse escaped from her prison (shut up down there!) so, why bore you all with a tiresome report. If I had a news-worthy story like the ‘Mudge, well, I’d be happy to share it.