Sisyphus’ map of tiny, perfect things

I’ve posted about Albert Camus’ philosophy regarding Sisyphus and how imagining him happy is a way to look at one’s own mundane, plodding life.

And I’ve also mentioned how Groundhog Day’s Phil Connors embodies Sisyphus.

Nice artwork, eh?

Well, I recently watched a campy, but fairly endearing story that takes both of those themes and includes them in the script.

“The Map of Tiny, Perfect Things” (Amazon Prime) does a pretty good job of depicting the trope of being stuck in the same day for eternity. It may not be worth watching more than once (like Bill Murray’s film), but it’s worth at least one viewing.

What struck me, of course, is that this connection I’d made between Phil Connors being Sisyphus was one I’d shared prolly four years ago. And it was cool to see the theme exposed in a film.

There’s the map of perfect things (places)

 

Clubbed — a card game

Roughly ten years ago, my daughter and I came up with a new card game. We were into table games and exploring various card games at the time. A few years later we decided to submit the game to a site that collected such things. Years later, they finally posted the game and referenced us in the notes. Years after that, a few months ago, in fact, Mark (referenced below) contacted me, had found the game and wanted to produce a video. This is his excellent effort.

Strange how things you post online catch up with you sometimes.

Cheers,

‘Mole

Live Long and Prosper — in AI

Yes, the dead will speak. And they will have trained themselves to do it.

(See prior posts regarding this topic.)

This is only the beginning.

From Reuters:

quote:

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Actor William Shatner, best known for forging new frontiers on the “Star Trek” TV series, has tapped new technology that will give current and future generations the chance to query him about his life, family and career.

Shatner, who turned 90 on Monday, spent more than 45 hours over five days recording answers to be used in an interactive video created by Los Angeles-based company StoryFile.

Starting in May, people using cellphones or computers connected to the internet can ask questions of the Shatner video, and artificial intelligence will scan through transcripts of his remarks to deliver the best answer, according to StoryFile co-founder Stephen Smith.

Fans may even be able to beam Shatner into their living rooms in future, Smith said, as Shatner was filmed with 3-D cameras that will enable his answers to be delivered via a hologram.

Shatner, who played Captain Kirk on “Star Trek” from 1966 to 1969 and in a later series of “Star Trek” movies, answered 650 questions on topics from the best and worst parts of working on the classic sci-fi show to where he grew up and the meaning of life.

The Canadian-born actor said he “wanted to reveal myself as intimately as possible” for his family and others.

“This is a legacy,” Shatner said. “This is like what you would leave your children, what you’d leave on your gravestone, the possibilities are endless.”

:unquote

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In other news, my existence continues. Nothing much going on, nor has my muse escaped from her prison (shut up down there!) so, why bore you all with a tiresome report. If I had a news-worthy story like the ‘Mudge, well, I’d be happy to share it.

Happy Holiday Conglomeration

The holiday season is an amazing mishmash of ancient and contemporary traditions: Greek, Roman, Turkish, Norse, Germanic, Dutch, English, American and undoubtedly others, each adding their local and cultural influence. It’s rather like a potluck holiday, don’t you think?

  • Happy Saturnalia, may your servants and slaves wear your best finery. May your gift exchange provide you with humor and honor. And may your sacrifices be slight, may the blood spill—only a little.
  • May Saint Nicholas help you spread gifts, kindness and hope to all the children of the world.
  • May your Yule log burn throughout the night. May the mistletoe remain vibrantly green in your doorway and its associated fertility seep into your familial line.
  • May Frau Holle (Holly?), Old Mother Frost, shake her quilt to dust your lands with snow.
  • May the Twelve Days count up with your true love’s strange taste in gifts and the arrival of the Three Wise Men.
  • May your midnight mass be filled with solemn song and humble hymns.
  • May Sinterklaas ride his fine white horse, delivering treats to kids in need of an early morning sugar rush.
  • May Santa Claus and his trusty caribou break the laws of physics and geolocate your home and the deserving souls within.
  • May you dismiss your servants to box with their families on Boxing Day.
  • May the oil feed your lamp with guiding light during your eight crazy Hanukkah nights.
  • May your first fruits of Kwanzaa be as tasty as those delicious Texas ruby grapefruit.
  • May the miles of your twinkling lights blink all night to your neighbor’s chagrin, and may your pets avoid nibbling the poison poinsettias.
  • May you enjoy grandma’s fruitcake, despite its pickled fruit and leaden chew.
  • May the chocolate prizes behind each numbered door not taste of wax or plastic.
  • May your gingerbread house turn to stone, the gumdrop path escape theft and the candycane lamp post not droop to a sad, bent peppermint puddle.
  • May your stack of holiday cards grow each day, may your wreath avoid being blown down the street and may your tannenbaum retain its needles until you begin the nerve-wracking task of dragging its desiccated corpse from your living room.
  • But mostly, and I believe this is the primary reason we even celebrate this time of year, may the death of the old year and the birth of the new bring closure and the promise of better things to come.

Happy Holidays,
‘Mole

Holiday Addendum:

May your KFC be crisp and your Christmas Cakes be light and fluffy and available throughout the holiday.

May your Christmas Eve fondue bubble like molten gold and your lobster, oyster or favorite stew be as tasty as it was in your youth.

May your stockings burst with a cornucopia of treats and tokens of gratitude.

May the repetition of a thousand holiday carols drill their insidious ear-worms such that even when you’re away from their constant drone you continue to hum them beneath your breath.

May your Nativity Scene remain aglow despite the weather or vandals.

May your candles flicker, their wicks grown long and their wax not drip into the carpet.

May you find your hidden broom when the snow builds on your doorstep.

Regardless of your traditions may they bring you joy and contentment. If you know of others that you’d like to share…

And the village was saved

The pall has lifted.
The ugly shroud of Orangina has peel away.
The sword of rationality has pierced the hideous beast and left it golfing in denial.

About Damn Time!

I’m reminded of the lyrics from a Jim Stafford song, one I memorized as a teenager.
 
Here are the pertinent parts:
One day brought the rain and the rain stayed on
And the swamp water overflowed
Skeeters and the fever grabbed the town like a fist
(The swam overflowed indeed! Fully of criminals hired by Drumpf)

There came an unseen caller on a town where hope run dry
(Biden)

And the whole town took a sip
(of sanity)

Fever went away and the very next day the skies again were blue
(As well as the rest of the country. Yay, Democracy!)

Said don’t come lookin’ again.
(Oh, they will. The Rabid-Right can’t help itself.)

Yay Us! Mudge, @fifteencurmudgeon, you get to keep on livin’, aren’t you happy? Jesse, give the team a woof!